Steve Will, Chief Architect for IBM i, showed a couple of charts during a recent presentation to the COMMON Americas Advisory Council (CAAC)–one of which showed that IBM plans support for the IBM i at least through 2025. These charts caused some buzz on Twitter so Steve took to his blog to clarify things a little. His blog post doesn’t really present anything too shocking, but it does provide some very positive reinforcement of the long-term future of the IBM i. For example, he mentions, “our IBM i development team is working on two major releases after 7.1 already.”
There is a contingent of programmers who think that JavaScript just isn’t good enough. Most of the members of this group are fans of statically-typed languages like C# or ASNA Visual—languages where the compiler is always the first round of unit testing. In these languages, the compiler imposes strict compile-time checking that keeps your code from assigning a date data type to an integer. Many of these coders react negatively to JavaScript’s loosely typed variables, its lack of a formal class concept, and its dynamic nature (you can easily add methods and properties at runtime!). JavaScript doesn’t care if you assign a date data type to an integer. If you do, that’s on you!
ASNA Visual RPG (AVR) Classic 5.0 will be introduced this December. AVR 5.0 is the follow-on to AVR 4.x. It is specifically targeted to provide support for COM-based AVR for Windows 7 and Windows 8. Do note that AVR 5.0 will not support Windows XP for either development or deployment.
Visual Studio 2012 is available now and Windows 8 will be on October 26th (Windows 8 is available now to MSDN subscribers). Do note that Visual Studio 2012 only works with Windows 7 and 8, Visual Studio 2012 is not supported on Windows XP. If you still must juggle Windows XP and Windows 7 dependencies, don’t forget that Windows 7 offers superb (and free) Windows XP virtual machine support.
IBM recently released its latest IBM i road map. The road map doesn’t provide any surprises, except, for the first time ever (I think) IBM discloses how many worldwide IBM i customers there are. IBM claims that the IBM i is currently used by “more” than 150,000 businesses around the world. The number of actual IBM i boxes deployed around the world remains in play because there are many businesses with multiple IBM i boxes. Although the number of IBM i boxes in use pales in comparison to the number of Linux or Windows boxes in use, it’s still good news to see that the IBM i still enjoys a substantial, faithful following. A recent edition of IT Jungle provides some brief analysis of IBM’s “used by” number.
The ASNA Visual RPG beginning/intermediate class, held in ASNA’s San Antronio training room, is currently scheduled for January 14-18, 2013 and April 29 – May 3, 2013.